Tag Archives: networking

How to Write Your Book (or Next Book) Before You Retire

If you are here in Phoenix, I hope you’ll consider attending the National Speaker’s Association meeting on Saturday. Gwyn Nichols and I will be presenting on the success of me winning her services at a silent auction (see past posts Collaborating with an Expert and Life Transformations through Silent Auctions for details of how Maddie and I have worked with Gwyn)

Here’s the information about our part of the meeting:

At an NSA-Arizona Silent Auction, Debra bid on Gwyn’s donation of manuscript editing — about a week after she and her co-presenter Maddie Hunter first considered writing a book. That bold commitment and Gwyn’s consultant support moved them from thinking about a book to thoroughly researching and beginning it.

Learn how the three of them worked together to get this book moving fast. See how you can apply these perspectives and strategies to advance your own project.

Gwyn Nichols, a book editor and ghostwriter, recently founded Blue Monarch Press. Gwyn trained at an academic journal where she was known for translating articles written by PhDs into readable English. At the time, she suffered from such an incapacitating writing block of her own, she considered changing her major from English to chemistry. Eventually, Gwyn learned to write fluently any time, anywhere, and she went on to complete a master’s degree in English. She now writes poetry and fiction, and edits nonfiction, combining language expertise with healing encouragement as she works with authors or leads writing retreats.

Debra Exner helps her clients connect, communicate, and collaborate. She and her co-author, Maddie Hunter of New Jersey, first led a cancer support organization together, and then went on to research and teach effective collaboration. They lead workshops for corporations and associations, and are being invited to speak at international conferences.

In addition to speaking and training, Debra is a Professional Certified Coach and president of the Phoenix chapter of the International Coach Federation.

Come hear this outstanding program!
To register online visit http://nsa-arizona.org/meetings/mar-13/
or by email, send name, company and number of attendees to Gwen@nsa-arizona.org or call (480) 968-7443.


Register

NSA-Arizona Program March 13, 2010
Time: 9:00 a.m.; networking 8:00 a.m.
Business Building Session: 12:15 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
Location: NSA Conference Center, 1500 S. Priest Dr., Tempe, AZ
Early Registration (by 5 p.m. Wed. Mar. 10): $30/members, $45/guests
Late Registration: $40/members, $55/guests
No refunds after 5 p.m. Mar. 10, 2010.
For directions, visit Mapquest.com
Please notify us if you have any special needs for the meeting.

Debbie

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Crowdsourcing at Netflix

The challenge: Create an algorithm that was 10% better than the one Netflix was currently using to recommend movies to subscribers and win $1,000,000!

The contest began on October 2, 2006 and was expected to take some time. It is a great example of crowdsourcing, or community-based design, which allows organizations to become more porous and tap talent outside of their organization.

“It’s been quite a drama,” said Neil Hunt, Netflix chief product officer. “At first, a whole lot of teams got in — and they got 6-percent improvement, 7-percent improvement, 8-percent improvement, and then it started slowing down, and we got into year two. There was this long period where they were barely making progress, and we were thinking, ‘maybe this will never be won.’

On September 21, 2009 Netflix awarded the $1M Grand Prize to the collaborative team “BellKor’s Pragmatic Chaos.” Tune in tomorrow to find out about the role of collaboration in this contest!

Debbie

Who do you find through Social Media?

The Phoenix chapter of the International Coach Federation holds periodic Living Room Salons — small gatherings (20 people max) in a member’s living room to discuss a coaching related topic and share ideas.

Last week’s Salon included a mini discussion about whether people’s networks of contacts are growing more like-minded or more varied as a result of Social Media (for this purpose include things like chat rooms and special interest listservs, as well as LinkedIn, Face book etc).

What do you think? Take our poll at http://polls.linkedin.com/poll-results/75524/gsgcc and/or leave a comment below.

Debbie

Crisis to Collaboration

I would have never guessed that a life-changing collaboration could grow from medical turmoil, yet that’s how Debbie Exner and I found one another. The year was 2003 and I was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma. Through an Internet search, I met Debbie, whose family had also been touched by this illness and we even both were professional coaches.

Getting Started

Getting Started

We have filled the past six years growing our friendship, sharing leadership of a cancer support network, co-facilitating workshops, and observing the fascinating ins and outs of our collaboration. Although living in different states with different time zones, we set aside regular times to meet by phone, serving as sounding boards for one another and hatching joint projects. In 2009, a book that had been incubating in each of us cracked open, asking for our joint attention. The dream of a co-authored book began to take shape.

This blog is growing out of the research, interviews, reading and conversations we are enjoying as we work on our book—our book about collaboration.  Here we create a place to ask the important questions and to strengthen the collaborative muscle in each of us, and inspire the communities where we live and work. We will ask provocative questions.  We hope you will join the conversation.

How did you get started collaborating?

Maddie